Of Ant Mounds, Pretty Lawns and Healing

Where I live it rains a lot and it’s warm for most of the year. The soil is rich volcanic clay. Things grow really well, including grass and bugs. Along with those wonderful things come mould, mud, mosquitoes, tropical parasites and a roaring trade in lawn mowing and garden equipment repairs. And along with all that also comes – ANT MOUNDS!

Picture yourself coming out on a sunny morning to see your beautifully mowed, bright green spring lawn covered in little conical mounds of mud at the rate of up to 20 per square metre: like a minefield on your lovely lawn that you have to step carefully through, unless you want mud packed into your soles and up the sides of your shoes, or between your toes and under your toenails.

Many people in this area react by poisoning the ants, to keep their lawns looking pretty. All good, yeah?

Well, hang on a minute, let’s look at what’s really going on here. That high rainfall and that rich clay soil means – waterlogging. I watched my lovely big tomatoes and avocado tree curl up their toes and die in one very wet season, and there were shortages of avocadoes, tomatoes and many other fruits and vegetables all over the region.

So, what have ant mounds got to do with it? Well, ants live in a dense network of tunnels – like a city under your lawn. When they make those mud mounds they are bringing up all the soil that’s washed into their hallways due to the rains. They clear their underground city’s tunnels thus allowing air to flow though.

Of Ant Mounds, Pretty Lawns and Healing Of Ant Mounds, Pretty Lawns and Healing
Of Ant Mounds, Pretty Lawns and Healing Of Ant Mounds, Pretty Lawns and Healing

The piles of mud brought topside can at last dry out in the sporadic warm sun. And they are in tiny grains, no longer the big rock-hard, water-repellent clumps they used to be. Thus what the ants do for themselves, they are also doing for everyone, keeping the soil aerated and soft so plant roots are happy and plants can grow well and be productive. Great, so we must accept the good work the ants are doing and perhaps adjust our perspectives on aesthetics.

But what’s this ant mound blog got to do with health and healing?

Well, just like that ant-soil-plant-ecosystem process, there are ALL kinds of processes of clearing and correction to maintain vitality and balance whether it be the ants, bandicoots, groundhogs or badgers digging up our gardens, or entire rainforests, deserts, oceans, coastal reefs, etc., right down to our cells and our body. Our body is also an ecology which maintains itself dynamically, clearing out stagnation and old stuff to keep the flow going and the balance harmonious. And our body process, the ant and soil process and all others like it, are connected and mutually dependent in one big sphere of life.

Do we treat our bodies like many people treat the ant mounds? Do we complain about the farts, coughs, rashes, headaches, pains, cellulite and pimples? Do we resort to various treatments to keep ourselves ‘looking good’ (on the outside) like a pretty lawn, while the stagnation and old toxic substances and energies build up unseen below the surface because they are not being cleared?

Do we want a temporarily pretty lawn at the expense of the long-term health of our garden and the land? Do we want a nice-looking body, one that we can do to whatever we want at the expense of our long-term health and wellbeing? Well, ‘better out than in’ as they say, is my feeling here. Of course clearing something from our bodies can be uncomfortable and not-so-pretty at times.

What if we were to change our views and accept the lovely ecological re-balancing opportunity being offered by our illnesses?

With this I don’t mean trying to get sick, continuing to disregard and abuse our bodies or keep accumulating toxins, which will then force our body to correct and clear itself! What I do suggest is taking a deeper look at our relationship to how things look on the surface, our comfort, convenience, and aesthetics, and what might really be going on underneath as a totality.

So perhaps when we see those ant mounds, or holes dug by the other little ‘ecology minders’ in our gardens, it can be a reminder to us about the ecology within our bodies and how that connects to and is part of the whole big picture of life on Earth.

Inspired by the work of Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine.

By Dianne Trussell BSc Hons, Goonellabah, NSW, Australia

Related Reading:
What are Illness and Disease?
Choosing the Best Medicine for Me: Bringing Self-Care into Health-Care
Illness and Disease are Healing

1,086 thoughts on “Of Ant Mounds, Pretty Lawns and Healing

  1. Great analogy Dianne. The ant mounds that people don’t like are very similar to the illnesses our bodies sometimes have to have to correct and imbalance in our bodies ecosystem. The choice is to poison them and hope they go away (ie take pills, use lotions etc) or be appreciative of the amazing work they are doing to clear and maintain the wellbeing of the whole.

  2. It reminds me of how we “keep up appearances” and don’t allow people in to see exactly what we are feeling or what is going on in our lives, yet it is still there festering away – better expressed out than held in!

  3. Dianne, your blog beautifully highlights the importance of always giving consideration to the bigger picture of all events which we encounter or experience in life. By doing this we will often become aware of the underlying divine design that is at play in situations which upset or irritate us in daily life.

  4. I love the message here about not separating the part from the whole. Our body is one whole unit and never can it be regarded as separate bits, as every part is dependant on every other part to allow for order to be maintained.

  5. A great question to ponder on – is the way we look and the way our lives outwardly look more important than our ongoing health, health and learning? Take for example if we have a spot – we tend to cover it up, instead of embracing the fact that our body is clearing out stuff we’ve been accumulating. It’s a crazy waste of energy to put more effort into hiding our imperfections and healings than into actually learning from them and making changes in our life.

  6. Ants are amazing in their commitment to purpose, and that is the health of the colony as a whole, working together in true brotherhood, a beautiful reflection to us as a humanity.

  7. Dianne, this is a phenomenal blog to re-visit. I love how you encompass the bigger picture of life and the interdependence with everything, from human beings to ants to return us to the Universal harmony that we are part of.
    “Our body is also an ecology which maintains itself dynamically, clearing out stagnation and old stuff to keep the flow going and the balance harmonious. And our body process, the ant and soil process and all others like it, are connected and mutually dependent in one big sphere of life”.

  8. Great article Diane, very insightful and on point. I recently had a esoteric healing session and the practitioner shared with me some of things that they observed in my body, and some of that was a back log of ‘stuff’ I was holding onto. I had been ‘clogging up my underground pipes’ by holding on to stuff energetically. This causes disharmony in the body and it was super clear for me that I need to look after my insides, beyond nourishing food and drink etc.., and that energetically it is important to review what we ‘store in our bodies’ and see what is time to be let go. Less holding onto things.

    1. Like the ant mounds where people have knocked them over or tried to poison them, I have done that to myself when old patterns rear up and I either pretend they don’t exist or push them down. Like stumping on the mounds energetically saying I don’t want to see you. The thing is, is that the pattern that has come up is not truly me anyway it’s more an opportunity to see it and allow it to go.

  9. Ants know how to work together to make things happen and to support their network of tunnels and keep things flowing. It makes sense to dry out their home after a deluge of water, but we humans don’t stop to look deeper and see what is really happening because we want our lawns to look pristine and perfect. I can see the analogy of how we treat our body, when we pour food and drink into our bodies and indulge then our body has to get rid of the excess by a pimple a fart and any other means it can. The difference is we don’t see it that way and try and cover and hide our pimples and blemishes rather than looking deeper at why they are there in the first place.

  10. “Do we resort to various treatments to keep ourselves ‘looking good’ (on the outside) like a pretty lawn, while the stagnation and old toxic substances and energies build up unseen below the surface because they are not being cleared?” This is such a valuable question Dianne and very pertinent to so many of us. What value is there in looking good on the outside if our inner subsoil is unhealthy and full of toxic waste. Eventually our outer health will suffer and will reflect our true state of health for all to see.

  11. Imagine if we really understood and applied the fact that what we do affects everyone? It would bring us to a much greater sense of responsibility.

  12. How amazing that everything works together towards a bigger purpose we don’t always realise and that when we take out one part of the whole the other part of the whole we do like does not work as well anymore either. A great reflection for life.

  13. I Love to watch ants, the brotherhood and cooperation on this ant scale is awesome to watch, you see the flow and harmony. This inspires me.

  14. It seems the humble ant has much to reflect to us. And I love the fact that they build ‘pyramids’ too. Maybe this is another reflection for us all.

  15. I really get a sense that when we think we know better than what our body or the nature reflects us and try to control what is happening, we miss out on a great learning that is being offered.

    1. We know so little about our bodies, and we also do not cultivate a relationship with it to learn from it and work with it, and it has much wisdom to share.

  16. I didn’t know you had badgers in Australia!!! What I love here is you have zoomed out from the micro to the macro and helped us see a far bigger picture in a very healthy way. And to instead stop and ask ourselves ‘why?’ before we do something for superficial reasons whether it be to make our lawn or our body look good and instead ask the question whats really going on.

    1. Vicky we don’t have badgers in Australia, but we have wombats which may be similar in some respects!

  17. I love how you present here the possibility that we approach illness and disease as an opportunity for our body to re-balance and I would go on to say that’s something we can appreciate the beauty of and the potential for learning that may be there in it for us too.

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