My Relationship with Religion

I have always found the words ‘religion’ and ‘God’ quite annoying and I didn’t really know why until I started questioning their meaning and re-interpretation – or misinterpretation to be more exact. I never knew how the word religion was originally used and what it really meant: because it had never been truly explained to me, I never knew the true meaning of religion.

Having grown up sailing around the world, and having met many different people from different cultures and organised religions, I didn’t understand how they all had a religion with a ‘god’ and their god was better than someone else’s God. And their religions were all so different. It never felt right… like seriously, we are all essentially the same, we are all one humanity but how can we have so many people with a different idea about religion and who is to say which one is right? Continue reading “My Relationship with Religion”

Hearing and Seeing versus Feeling

Do we go mainly on what we hear and see, rather than what we feel?

Recently while watching a College of Universal Medicine web broadcast, Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine presented something that really made me feel and see just how I relate with, and to the world. In truth, what was presented here feels like the tip of a very deep iceberg, of something that has been going on and has been deeply ingrained in me – and probably society – for a very long time. That is, do we mainly go on what we hear and see, rather than what we feel? There is still a lot for me to learn with this, but while I’m in the process of exploring it I felt it was important to express what was experienced. Continue reading “Hearing and Seeing versus Feeling”

Organised Religion versus True Religion

Why are there so many different versions of religion, with each one saying they are the correct path to God?

This is the question I have each time a religious milestone is celebrated worldwide – Christmas for me is the greatest example of this.

Continue reading “Organised Religion versus True Religion”

“I don’t do that!”

Recently it’s come to my attention that when I claim that I am not a part of something, it comes to light that I actually am very much a part of that which I have believed myself to be immune to or separate from, and that my misperception arises simply because I do not display the same behaviours as someone who is expressing them in the most extreme forms.

For example: I considered myself to be very open and welcoming of all people. Having been brought up in a predominantly English town and countryside and attending a school with Christian beliefs, my interactions with those of other racial backgrounds and religious affiliations were limited. But because I was not outwardly verbal or actively engaging in hate speech or intolerance towards others, as I had seen some people do, I assumed that I held no prejudices, but was instead a very open person.

Continue reading ““I don’t do that!””

Death and Passing Over, we need to Talk about it

Someone close to me recently passed over. What has come to my awareness is how we don’t generally talk about death, even our own, or a person’s last days in their current lifetime.

Could it be by talking about death from the start of our life, and not seeing it as an end, but the truth of what it is – a passing over, evolution, and the start of a new cycle to begin – we would have a very different relationship with ourselves, death, life, evolution and purpose, and how we prepare for our own or another’s passing over, and how we care for those dying?

Continue reading “Death and Passing Over, we need to Talk about it”

A Life of Purpose

Some research released late last year shows that only 13% of employees, sampled from more than 140 countries, are “engaged” in their jobs, invested in or focussed on helping their organisations or work places to improve (1).

It also shows that 63% of people are “not engaged” – or simply unmotivated and unlikely to exert extra effort – whilst the remaining 24% are “actively disengaged” or truly unhappy and unproductive. Continue reading “A Life of Purpose”

How Many Ways am I Like a Child?

I remember being a very aware and joyful child, at two years of age or younger. It’s clear that something happened to me between then and adulthood. How is it that adult life becomes so serious, so burdened, that we constantly look for ways to numb and escape? TV, chocolate, alcohol, work, sex… somehow never recapturing that joyful flow, wisdom, presence and sensitivity of childhood. I like to observe kids, as many adults do. Something in them answers questions in us, even if we don’t know we’re asking. I wonder whether all of the child I was is really lost, or still in there somewhere? I do have a very playful, silly ‘streak’ and don’t mind looking ‘childish’ in public if I’m having harmless fun, like doing slippery-shoe slides along the shopping mall floor, or hanging out of a nice tree.

But I notice with some sadness that what’s classed as ‘fun’ by many adults is harmful of themselves and others. It seems the definition of a good weekend can be: how destroyed by alcohol your brain and body is by Monday morning, or how many videos you watched, or whether you’re in pain from an overstuffed stomach at a smorgasbord, or whether you ‘scored’ in a night club, or how ache-y you are from too much hard work in the gym, house and garden…. To me, none of these feel like the flowing joys of childhood. Why should ‘simple and healthy’ be associated with children, whilst ‘complicated and harmful’ are associated with adulthood?

Continue reading “How Many Ways am I Like a Child?”