Foresight is 20/20 

I imagine most people have at some point heard someone say that ‘hindsight is 20/20’ after an event that typically left someone feeling a certain level of guilt, shame, remorse or desire that whatever unfolded would have ended with a different result. The phrase denotes a sense that once we experience the outplay of a life event that may have resulted in something we did not necessarily want to happen (like an accident or mistake), it is easy to look back in time, so to speak, and understand all the factors and decisions that led up to that negative experience occurring, hence the 20/20 perfect vision connotation.

But I have noticed a repetitive pattern, and thus a correlation between the times that I have had these ‘hindsight is 20/20’ moments, where I felt awful about something that happened and that I was responsible for, and my initial negative emotional reactions to someone or a previously unforeseen circumstance that life presented to me. It’s as if these reactions that were based on things like doubt, fear of judgment from others, lack of self-worth or low confidence set off a chain reaction (pun intended) of events that culminated in my having those ‘could have, should have, and would have’ moments as an end result.

What if, instead of always looking back and wishing we had made different choices, we focused a bit more on responding to life’s situations rather than reacting to them as if we can’t handle what is being presented to us to learn and grow from. By responding, I mean that we can use our innate ability to simply feel what is happening from an energetic standpoint and perhaps what factors have contributed to ourselves and others acting in the way they are, and then answering the call to move ourselves in a harmonious way with what is needed in that moment, no more and no less. In this way, we can use our amazing ability to observe the truth of what is being presented to us to learn and evolve with, and that is exactly what I am proposing as our foresight vision being 20/20.

The dictionary definition that I found for foresight is:

the ability to predict what will happen or be needed in the future – Lexico.com (1).

Now, I am not saying that everyone needs to be Nostradamus here and predict the future (although I do feel we all have had instances of feeling and knowing what was about to happen, as in a friend calling on the phone right after they popped into your mind), but that we definitely can all feel what is needed in a given situation and begin to let go of the emotionally and eventual physically damaging practice of looking back on life’s events or mistakes in a regretful way that ignores the possibility that what unfolded in that instance was exactly what we needed as a reflection of where we were at in our own personal development, and offered a great lesson that we could utilise and pass on to others for the rest of our lives.

I know for myself that every time I went over in my head something yucky that happened in my life – as if I could somehow change the past outcome with sheer willpower and repeated thoughts – it only resulted in a lot of stress, was exhausting, and did not help or change anything. For to truly value all that life presents for us, as being held by a divine love that is guiding us back to a more soulful way, is quite liberating indeed. It’s in these lived experiences where true wisdom is born.

By Michael Goodhart, Aircraft Technician, B.A. Psychology, Lover of Nature and being playful with life, North Carolina, USA

References:

  1. Lexico Dictionaries | English. (2019). foresight | Definition of foresight in English by Lexico Dictionaries. [online] Available at: https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/foresight [Accessed 18 May 2019].

Further reading:
Soul Magic – divine magic at play
Taking it personally – reaction versus response
Responding to the Call

 

53 thoughts on “Foresight is 20/20 

  1. You can’t change the past and to continually re-visit it wishing it was different holds everything in the present moment at a stand-still, it’s holding love at bay. Letting go and surrendering to what is allows for the healing of the past and the present moment to be of ‘Love’.

  2. We all have a responsibility to hold the integrity of words, and thus have to share that it is the energetic truth as we have lost the true meaning of so many key words and words hold us in our essences when we use them in their true meaning!

  3. We could say that the ability to discern energy (what is love and what is not) strengthens our foresight in a way that helps us to pre-empt what comes next so we don’t have to rely on our hindsight to get us out of the mess we blindly walked into. For example, if I know that I am not connected to love then I can already feel a disharmony in my body, so naturally it follows that my movements will be disharmonious and this will result in discord should I not come back to love and move in the harmony of this. Sounds easy enough but where most of us stumble is how to move with true settlement when you are surrounded by disharmony because there is a constant group pull to submerge ourselves in the mass discord. Hence why we rely on hindsight to show us where we tripped up after the event has occurred and not before.

  4. I get a sense that the regret is knowing we abdicated responsibility and feeling the consequences of that impact on others as well as ourselves. Considering the movements that we made before the ‘event’ itself is a way to start to understand how nothing ‘just happens’. There are decisions made, sometimes long before, the event itself and give it space or influence others to collude or conspire to make it happen. Taking this level of responsibility for my own behaviour and movements has freed up my understanding about how and why things happened or keep happening. If we are prepared to invest in change, there is always a set of unsubtle clues left behind.

    1. Change brings change and repetition brings repetition and the beauty of this is that we can simply look at what’s happening around us and see if things are changing or not. Things should be changing all the time if we’re truly refining our quality, our relationships should be deepening and our lives should be becoming more purposeful and if they’re not, then brilliant that’s just a sign that we need to bring in more change.

  5. There’s nothing worse than having that cringe feeling years after something occurred. It’s far more healthy to have no regrets in that moment by asking ourselves some simple questions as to why we have done what we did and taking responsibility for what took place. Then these embarrassing moments no longer have a hold over us and cannot hold us to ransom.

  6. Talking of foresight and in taking the ‘sight’ part of this what was really noticeable for me yesterday and today is just how sore my eyes are and the reading is how I am looking at life instead of receiving it allowing myself just to be with me.

  7. When we approach something that can appear to be a disaster as an opportunity it allows us to grow from the experience – thereby totally debasing the need for blame and self bashing. We allow ourselves to see what the lesson is that we need to learn and embrace the moment.

  8. Responding rather than reacting to situations – feels a more empowering way to live. Spotting and nominating more of my reactions to myself these days is enabling me to react less

  9. Fantastic blog Michael, you really expose the fallacies of giving ourselves a hard time with our thinking and going over things – ‘if I could somehow change the past outcome with sheer willpower and repeated thoughts’. Rather if we consider what life presents to us and how we can respond and learn from us and see it’s invitation to expand and be more who we are; this is a completely different paradigm and far more deeply enriching.

  10. I’ve recently found out I made a huge mistake with big and unpleasant financial consequences. It’s painful to feel but this blog reminds me what I need to focus on at times like this. Thank you.

  11. Judgement imprisons us in a perpetual cell of ‘should of’s’ and ‘could of’s’ – constantly berating ourselves. The Soul looks at life simply from ‘how to evolve’. No matter how many times we fell in that hole the chance to feel, read and understand is always at hand. Thanks Michael!

  12. I know that since attending the workshops and presentation of Universal Medicine I have a completely different way of looking at life. There is something momentous happening right now that before Universal Medicine would have me is an absolute spin of feeling insecure and what the heck is going to happen to me now, how will I survive, make ends meet etc. But from all that I have learnt these past 13 years have come together so that actually I’m not spinning out, I’m very upbeat about the future there is no insecurity because what cannot be taken away from me is my connection to the universe and that to me is all that matters. Imagine if all humanity decided to access the God the universe in such a way, this would demolish insecurity over night. It is the need/ want to be secure that gets in the way of relinquishing everything up to God in the way that Jesus did over 2,000 years ago.
    Luke 22:42 And he said, “Father, if you are willing, let this cup pass from me; however not my will, but yours be done.”
    Aramaic Bible in Plain English

  13. Instead of looking at a situation and feeling awkward about the outcome and how we did or didn’t deal with something it’s more helpful and healing to get to our responsibility and where we have contributed. The other day I was in reaction about something and when I was talking to someone he said the words ‘That was cold’ referring to someone’s actions towards me and at that moment I thought there’s something being reflected to me. So I went away and looked at things from every angle, consulted with family members to get to the bottom of the feeling I had. The realisation came when I had been that cold and unloving in my twenties and had equally contributed in the same way. It was simple and the feeling lifted. It works when we trace our steps backwards and can take responsibility for having acted in an unloving way towards others, then we get to understand how we have contributed to the rot that we now find as our everyday.

  14. This stood out to me today ‘that we definitely can all feel what is needed in a given situation’. That we know! But we don’t always bring, express and do what is needed. Which shows on a large scale how, as humanity, we are holding back. I feel its high time to address the ways I hold back and where I hold back in life!

  15. Michael, great points raised here for us to ponder on. I know I have found that the more I am prepared to honestly look at situations when they arise, the more clearly I see my part in what has eventuated. What’s more, these days I am also understanding that when things crop up, I am actually being gifted a wonderful opportunity to also learn more about myself and from there, I have the opportunity to make changes that can lead to very different outcomes when the next issue arises.

    1. How true Helen, being honest and expressing in the present moment, is a great opportunity to know the love that is being shown us and “to learn more about myself”. It immediately stops the ‘if only’ reaction of what we could have done in any given situation.

      1. Mary I like how you have deepened the conversation by reminding us just how much we are loved by giving us the opportunity to learn more about how we react. When we react we are after all letting a poison into our bodies which if allowed to accumulate by, not dealing with the reaction, bring on illness and disease.

  16. What a gorgeous invitation to shift our relationship with mistakes away from shame, guilt and regret to an openness to learn and an acceptance that our purpose is to be students of life ready and willing to grow and learn in every moment.

  17. We must have pictures, beliefs and ideals about how life is supposed to be to react so strongly to events and mistakes. It’s a great topic Michael as I am still working through reactions, once they begin they cloud the opportunity to respond as you’re suggesting, which is an openness and allowance to receive whatever is occurring, and a trust in ourselves to feel it all, read, respond and learn.

  18. ‘I know for myself that every time I went over in my head something yucky that happened in my life – as if I could somehow change the past outcome with sheer willpower and repeated thoughts – it only resulted in a lot of stress, was exhausting, and did not help or change anything.’ We can tie ourselves up in knots, feel massive regret and a lot of sadness if we approach life in this way. Speaking for myself too, I have experienced this and have not enjoyed it. Knowing no other way, I was stuck in a rut and pushed those feelings down, not knowing what else to do with them – each one compacting on the last. It wasn’t until I met Serge Benhayon that I began to appreciate these so called negative events as opportunities to clear those hurts and feel the liberation you talk of Michael.

    1. You raise a great point here Michelle about how when something challenging or unexpected happens in our life, like making what we consider a mistake, we tend to compartmentalise it and not want to feel what this event is bringing up for us. But if we can take the pressure off ourselves to not be so perfect, and simply view the circumstances as opportunities to learn something more deeply about ourselves and grow from it, it becomes easier to move forward and allow ourselves the space to see what is needed from that point onward.

      1. Beautifully said Michael. When I have allowed myself to feel the sadness, or whatever the issue is that has come up, I have discovered that it really doesn’t feel as bad as all that because in the rawness there is an honesty and the beauty of feeling fragile – there is certainly a grace in it if we allow it and definitely an opportunity to nominate what has hurt, why and to take responsibility for it.

    2. Does this process of continuing to beat ourselves up, become a bit like Ourobores, the snake that eats its own tail? It becomes an endless cycle that never ends until we choose to stop.

  19. I have never heard of this particular phrase with the 20/20 bit ‘hindsight is 20/20’ but have heard of hindsight and 20/20 vision. The key to what you share here is the difference between responding or reaction. The way I see responding to be, is for me to get self out of the way (reaction) take a step back from whatever the situation is and then the response needed will come. I don’t always live this! But am working at making this, responding, my normal rather than reacting.

  20. Emotional out plays are a sure sign we are living with an expectation or belief and these both end up with us being in comparison, letting go of comparison in any form will always be evolutionary.

  21. I was talking to someone recently and they suggested that to look at something in the past with regret or remorse is self-defeating but rather focus on what is needed right now and move from there. And this makes sense to me because so often we spend so much time in regret we do not appreciate all that is now before us.

    1. When we look back with either regret, remorse, anger, bitterness or any other similar emotion it is because we are looking back through the narrow slits of our human eyes.. The silly thing is that often what we are looking back and judging as a ‘negative’ event or period in our lives actually held a lot of potential evolution but by viewing it through our ‘human eyes we fail to see it as it truly was. Our ‘human eyes’ look at things based on our very limited and biased pictures and ideas about how things should be, whereas our soul sees everything as spherical and so has a 360 lens through which to view life. The soul can easily see that there is nothing that is outside of life, it is all the one glorious activity with the sole purpose of leading us back to God.

    2. Regret and remorse bring with it the ‘if only…..’. This truly is a waste of time and feeling emotional about something we can do nothing about. When viewed as a learning opportunity, so that we never repeat such a mistake we can grow in emotional maturity.

  22. Feeling what is needed is far simpler than looking back in regret. If I do look back these days I feel into the energy that created the situation in the first place. Then there is no emotion but an opportunity to be honest and take responsibly for my side of the event.

    1. Great learning in this. Thank you Leigh. To ‘look back’ and review situations without judgement or criticism but a willingness to learn makes the world of difference – and will make the world a very different place.

    2. What I can really appreciate after reading this is that I do not have any regrets. None. That is amazing, what I can appreciate is how I have been able instead to take responsibility for my life and choices and learn and grow from this. It hasn’t always been this way there were times in my life I did regret but now I have a better understanding of life, me, love, choices, responsibility and energy a lot has healed.

  23. It’s not uncommon for us to use a past so-called mistake to punish ourselves with, even years after it occurred, instead of learning from it and letting ourselves off the hook.

    1. ‘We learn by our mistakes’, for me the word ‘mistakes’ is not truthful as it implies that we have done something ‘wrong’ and as there is no truth in either right or wrong then the sentence does not feel true to me. It would be much truer to say ‘We learn from our opportunities to evolve’

  24. When we have these moments of hindsight for something we chose to do that has gone terribly wrong, how often do we have a knee jerk reaction to think of who we can blame? Is this not a tried and tested tool of politicians and governments?

    1. I wonder what constitutes ‘terribly wrong’? Terribly wrong for one person might be incredible for another, for example I have heard people who have had terrible accidents refer to their accidents as absolute gifts. Again it seems that how we view life (through our beliefs, conditioning, personal experiences, ideas about how things should be) determines our experience of life.

      1. I agree Alexis. Different people with a similar illness will have a different take on it – and life. Some will return to the ‘same old’ way of doing things, once better, that may have contributed to their getting the disease in the first place. Another will use that disease as a learning opportunity to grow and evolve.

  25. ‘..but that we definitely can all feel what is needed in a given situation and begin to let go of the emotionally and eventual physically damaging practice of looking back on life’s events or mistakes in a regretful way that ignores the possibility that what unfolded in that instance was exactly what we needed as a reflection of where we were at in our own personal development, and offered a great lesson that we could utilise and pass on to others for the rest of our lives.’ It certainly feels like most of us feel regret when events unfold in a negative way, but what we are not appreciating is that those events unfolded precisely because we needed that learning. Once the lesson is learned we can be hard on ourselves for not getting it sooner, but in the context of lifetimes and in the context that we are here to learn about such things, we can soon turn that regret into the appreciation that things constellated in just such a way to teach us what we had yet to master. When perceived from this angle we can also appreciate just how held and supported we are, even in the face of challenging situations.

    1. “When perceived from this angle we can also appreciate just how held and supported we are, even in the face of challenging situations”. Michelle we’re such a long way from remembering that there is nothing but love but the truth of the matter is that all matter energetically is love but we see things with our conditioned human eyes and our minds interpret them to fit into our pre-rehearsed perceptions of the world but none of this is true. And so as you say Michelle we see ‘challenging situations’ as just that and often fail to feel the love that is inherent within them.

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