Individuality and Oneness

What happens when you take something that is inherently one and divide it into two or more parts, like slicing a carrot maybe? Does it lose its oneness or is it still innately one? It’s still the same carrot – but is it one or does it become two? There are slices of course, or ‘juliennes’ if that is your way of doing things. It’s a ridiculous suggestion, but do the bits of carrot compare themselves with each other and compete to be the best? Is there supremacy in the carrot world? Pretty soon they will be food anyway and so it doesn’t matter too much.

What happens when you take a race of beings that are inherently one and divide them? Do they lose their oneness and become two, or is the oneness still their true essence? If humanity is innately one race of beings – as the term ‘the human race’ suggests – what happens when the metaphorical kitchen knife comes along and divides it into races, nationalities, religions, cultures, et al? A separation is created: we become not one but two… or even many. There is duality where there was once singularity or oneness.

There are over 7.5 billion individuals in the world today. Often we celebrate individuality and the diversity of our race. Are we one as a race or are we divided? It seems pretty clear that we are divided. We have wars, murders, abuse, violence, inequality, extreme wealth and absolute poverty. We have racial hatred, high divorce rates, abandoned children, women murdered just for being women, high levels of loneliness and cyber-bullying on a large scale. This is not the ‘report card’ of a unified race of beings.

The word individuality is worth looking at more closely. I’m no linguist but it seems to me that the word individuality is comprised of three parts:

In/divi/duality.

An obvious interpretation of these three elements might be that as individuals, we are in a state of (in); division or dividedness (divi); that leads to or creates duality (duality): this is not based on any academic or etymological study, just a sense or feeling. If this is anywhere near the mark it suggests that to become an individual we have been divided from something whole and any whole thing divided becomes dual – a duality, or something with more than one part. But divided from what? Could it be from our innate state of togetherness or oneness? Have we, in living as individuals, created a separation from a true state of brotherhood?

We might argue of course that this is just the way it is, that we are born this way, in individual bodies, distinct and separate from each other. It certainly appears to be the case. But something does not feel right. Do wars, murders, rapes, abuses, corruption, extreme wealth and poverty, bullying, acrimonious divorces and so on feel like they are part of our true nature?

I know there are those who believe we are inherently evil and perhaps this explains things for them. To me, something doesn’t add up. If we are inherently evil, wouldn’t we enjoy all the suffering, violence, aggression, disharmony etc.? But we don’t. Most of us don’t, anyway. Might this be because somewhere within we know better? Somewhere within we feel the incongruence and are at odds with this way of living. Somewhere within that seed of brotherhood is still firmly planted in our being waiting for us to reawaken it. Isn’t that why it hurts when there is disharmony? Isn’t that why we feel that it doesn’t make sense?

Is it possible that even when divided on the surface, the true essence of our being remains untainted within? Do we, within us all, retain this sense that we are one body of humanity and that it is our purpose to reunite together in oneness? Perhaps this explains why there is so much tension in humanity – because we find ourselves pulled in two different directions. We are like a rubber band stretched to capacity, with one end held by the belief that we are distinct individuals and the other the innate knowing that we are part of a magnificent Oneness.

Is individuality then something to celebrate, or is it in truth the cause of all our woes, the very thing that divides us and leads us to commit all our offences and abuses against each other? Do we trust and accept the identifications we have created that divide and separate us? Or do we honour the deep sense of unity we know innately within?

By Richard Mills, UK

Related Reading:
Separateness or Connection
In our Essence we are One
Universal Medicine leads the way out of ‘The cult of individuality’

825 thoughts on “Individuality and Oneness

  1. We may live in every corner of the globe but the energy that flows through each and everyone of us connects us all as one.

  2. ‘Is it possible that even when divided on the surface, the true essence of our being remains untainted within?’ … Yes! ✨

  3. Richard, this is a great point to ponder on: “Is it possible that even when divided on the surface, the true essence of our being remains untainted within? Do we, within us all, retain this sense that we are one body of humanity and that it is our purpose to reunite together in oneness? Perhaps this explains why there is so much tension in humanity – because we find ourselves pulled in two different directions. We are like a rubber band stretched to capacity, with one end held by the belief that we are distinct individuals and the other the innate knowing that we are part of a magnificent Oneness.”

  4. If you take a drop from the ocean, it still holds all the properties of the ocean itself. The problems commence though when the drop thinks it is ‘IT’ and begins to forget where it came from, and forgets the larger part that it is always going to be a part of. When we choose individuality we lose the power that comes from being with the all.

    1. Wise words Henrietta. I have come to understand that when we choose to believe we are individual, we cut ourselves off from the awareness of everything we are part of. Hence we can then choose to live ‘as if we are not part of the greater whole’ – in the belief that we don’t affect it. Beliefs are powerful things it seems.

  5. When you compared the separation of our race and our human behaviour with the cutting up of a carrot it made me laugh till I realised it was not a laughing matter at all. It is crazy to promote separation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.