A Psychologist’s Perspective On Serge Benhayon

By Cynthia Hickman, Registered Psychologist

When I was twelve years old I looked out at the world and was appalled at what I saw … the inequality and the suffering. By the time I was sixteen I was devastated by the meaninglessness of it all. It seemed that life was about getting a job, buying a house and having babies who would then grow up to do the same thing. There seemed to be no higher purpose. And no one seemed bothered by this.

I felt like I was living in an insane asylum and in fact I came across the writing of psychologist R.D. Laing who indeed said that ‘normal’ was insane. By the time I was nineteen I was suicidally depressed by it all.

Obviously I survived, and my inquiry into life and being human led me to the study of psychology. But by the time I was twenty-eight I realised that I had overlooked the most important aspect of life – the inner being-ness; I called it the soul. I then knew that I had to be a psychologist who could help people find this inner being, so I called myself a soul-centred psychologist. Not a term to garner the respect of my peers!

The trouble however was that I had very little to guide me. They didn’t teach soul psychology at university! So I felt it was my business to explore any alternative teachings that might illuminate the way … I wanted to offer my clients the best I could find to help them manage the difficult business of being human. Many clients that came to me were hungry for information about their deeper spiritual nature and found no answers to this in mainstream culture. So for two decades I tried every workshop known to man! Among other things I have tested Tantra, shared Satsang, primal screamed, created shamanic ceremony, tried to be a Buddhist and re-birthed myself silly.

Along the way I learned a lot of useful things but I knew I hadn’t found the right teaching for me, something that would deliver consistent ongoing results for my self and others, something that explained how to bring the love of the soul into the body and into everyday life.

Then I attended a Universal Medicine retreat with Serge Benhayon and I sat there gob-smacked as he spoke about everything I knew deep inside but could never have articulated. This was the teaching I had been looking for.

Serge’s teaching was different to many others. He spoke about love not emptiness. Engagement not retreat. Embodiment not transcendence. Service not bliss. He spoke about stillness instead of ecstasy and he spoke about steady progress not the transient highs of emotional catharting. And he emphasised the importance of focusing on the body…bad news for a sugar addict but something I knew to be true if I really meant it about bringing the energy of the soul into the human body! Then he gave simple commonsense strategies for bringing health and joy into life.

My own inner progress now is incremental and consistent. It is not about enlightenment, which is what I had learnt from Eastern teachings. It is about embodying love in everyday life. So now, while I may get tired after work I don’t get exhausted like I did previously. And I feel more wellbeing than I ever have. And in my body – I never knew a body could feel so good! Many clients benefit from what I have learned from Universal Medicine and I can give them practical tools to develop self-love and deal with anxiety and depression.

Mainstream psychologists might question the teachings of Universal Medicine but to me, a psychology that does not have love and the human soul as its central theme is missing the whole point. I have always felt that it is the human heart that needs attention; that unless we heal the heart then the world’s ills will not heal, no matter how much charity, aid or political, technological or intellectual will we bring to the problem.

Change the inner being then the outer might begin to reflect this change. This is why I chose psychology as my modality. I wanted to work with the inner being. And I knew that love was the core ingredient needed for change – not romantic or emotional love but something much deeper within us. Not everyone wants to explore such things and that is fine. But for those that do, Universal Medicine’s teachings give a solid practical path from self-loathing to self love and onwards into loving service to humanity.

128 thoughts on “A Psychologist’s Perspective On Serge Benhayon

  1. There is such a contrast in the words like ’embodiment not transcendence’ and ‘stillness not ecstasy’. Each of these words has a package with them, and the spiritual ones feel like the goal is to get ‘out of body’, where the soulful ones feel like grounding the love of the universe into the body we live and express in. We don’t need to go out into the Universe to feel and know it, it’s already within us, in the body and not in the seeking mind.

  2. I couldn’t agree more with your words and central premise here Cynthia: “…a psychology that does not have love and the human soul as its central theme is missing the whole point.”
    I studied one year of psychology at university (and a ‘prestigious university’ at that…) – and was gobsmacked by how meaningless it was, and to be honest, how deeply disturbed those I met in the psychology department there seemed to be.
    Missing was the sense of wholeness you describe, that comes from a way of understanding and healing ourselves that is heart-centred, or cardio-centric. I became quite disillusioned at university and looking outward at a world that seemed so meaningless…
    The teachings and work of Serge Benhayon were absolute music to my ears – holding the true and complete understanding I also knew within to be true, but for all my searching, had not found any parallels to (inclusive of up to this day).

  3. It makes perfect sense for a psychologist to be questioning the purpose of life, the connection to a universality, as this must be at the root of many of our issues. Also learning simple techniques to help people have an experience of this makes for a truly great practitioner… and not just what we say, but the example we live which is the greatest teacher of all.

  4. ‘He spoke about love not emptiness. Engagement not retreat. Embodiment not transcendence. Service not bliss.’ I love this line, so solid in what is being presented. This is what attracted me to Universal Medicine. The other stuff has always felt off to me…an escape from reality.

  5. ‘psychology that does not have love and the human soul as its central theme is missing the whole point.’- Very true how can one support another if they are not living lovingly for themselves and not connected to who they are (their soul).

  6. I think you are very brave to put yourself out there in this way, in your profession I can imagine that it could be very critical on anyone that may want to think outside the box but to me, isn’t that what Psychology is all about? If we can’t find new ways to address people and their issues, then we are not really doing our jobs…?

  7. Each time I read this I am reminded of the very real truth that nothing really changes, personally or on a world basis, until we allow the true essence we hold within to guide how we live.

  8. “Not everyone wants to explore such things and that is fine. But for those that do, Universal Medicine’s teachings give a solid practical path from self-loathing to self love and onwards into loving service to humanity.” And this is key here – Universal Medicine might not be for everyone “and that is fine”. For those of us who have chosen to explore is more for ourselves, every single person I know personally has found their lives enriched beyond measure by simply by learning to live from a reconnection to our innermost and making this the thing we focus on first and foremost.

  9. A good example about how we lost our sense in life by reducing and separation. We did separate Medicine, Religion and Philosophy from each other, thereby they are one and make sense just connected. Yes, the soul-aspect (so to speak) should be involved when we try to heal ourselves. As well as the connection and benefit/service to and for all. Only then we get out of this self created asylum – where nothing makes true sense.

  10. Dealing with depression and anxiety with the body will change the way we view mental illness. It makes sense to go to the body, for how can you have an ‘unstable mind’ if the body is not first ill? The root cause has to be somewhere and the body holds the recorded imprints of how life has been lived.

  11. I have never been into anything spiritual or new age. When I first heard Serge Benhayon speak my life changed. What he was sharing was so profound yet just made so much sense. I was stopped as his words resonated deep within me and my whole body was nodding with everything he said, I was also struck how I knew this but had never thought it before and how what he shares just makes so much sense yet we don’t live like this in life or with an awareness of this in life.

  12. I love what you have written so clearly Cynthia, “I have always felt that it is the human heart that needs attention; that unless we heal the heart then the world’s ills will not heal, no matter how much charity, aid or political, technological or intellectual will we bring to the problem.” So much time energy and money is spent doing what you above mentioned when it is simply an understanding of our divine essence and a connection to our inner heart of love where true change is found.

  13. ‘Mainstream psychologists might question the teachings of Universal Medicine but to me, a psychology that does not have love and the human soul as its central theme is missing the whole point.’ I totally agree Cynthia it makes perfect sense, because who is a psychologist treating if they are not treating the heart of the person.

  14. I cannot agree more with what you have expressed, Cynthia. Like you I tried many approaches in an attempt to make sense of the world and for a time felt I had found it in Tibetan Buddhism. However, the thought of excluding oneself from society to sit in isolated meditation for years at a time did seem to help anyone, except the participant to escape the responsibility of life. When you present that, “It is not about enlightenment, which is what I had learnt from Eastern teachings. It is about embodying love in everyday life”, then that truly made sense.

  15. Unless we heal the heart we will be forever at the mercy of that which is going on around us. I steer my ship learning to take responsibility for my life and when I do blame is impossible.

  16. I love that thanks to Universal Medicine you can now bring heart into psychology…. people so desperately need the love in service you provide, for it is the foundation of any true change.

  17. Yes Cynthia I completely agree. It seems that overlooking our connection to Soul is the disease of humanity, in that we focus only on being human rather than our being-ness, which is held within a human body. The presentations of Serge Benhayon and Universal Medicine offer a very tangible and accessible way of living that is guided by our connection to our love within, through which we can bring to life the light of our Soul through our bodies, and into the everyday lives we live. Not only does this way of living make sense, is enriching in many ways but also feels natural in every way, in which our bodies hum with vitality

  18. Universal Medicine teaches esoteric psychology and looks at the whole body not the mind from the mind. This is a fundamental flaw in mainstream psychology that does not apply love in the mind therefore, the body needs to be built from this from within to without not from without to within burying and complexing what issue is there.

  19. ” He spoke about love not emptiness. Engagement not retreat. Embodiment not transcendence. Service not bliss. He spoke about stillness instead of ecstasy and he spoke about steady progress not the transient highs of emotional catharting.”
    Cynthia, I love how you captured the teachings of Universal Medicine in this sentence, which at the same time clarifies the difference between the spiritual New Age and the esoteric way of being.

  20. Everyone is trying to look for truth, and many say that they deliver truth. I have also studied many guru’s and teachers and they never could made sense of the whole. Serge Benhayon was the first one that did, and I recognized that on a deeper scale when I met him. Even when he overturned many beliefs and ideals I had.

  21. If Psychology is about studying the mind and our subsequent behaviours how can we remove from the equation our heart considering so many of our behaviours are directly attributed to our hurts or from the our ‘broken heart’? I love that you acknowledge that there is more to a person than just their mind and head Cynthia – how can we ever think and accept that there is not I do not know.

  22. I love the feeling of how we can know things we have always seen and felt confirmed. This is what I take from this article, that nothing is really ever new and all appears as though it’s just a different recycled version of the same thing. When you come across something like Universal Medicine the only question becomes how far you are willing to take it as what is presented back to you is that you already have it all. From what I am seeing this is true for all of us as at some point or at many points we have seen that all is not well on the outside but we are lost to how to deal with all we see. Universal Medicine supports you to bring clearer all you are seeing anyway and from there life changes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s